VOTE AT THE BANC

 

Los Angeles County residents will have the opportunity to vote in-person or drop off Vote by Mail ballots.

 

• October 30 - November 2 | 10:00am-7:00pm
• ELECTION DAY | November 3 | 7:00am-8:00pm

 

Voters will access the center through the NW Gates on Christmas Tree Lane with voting booths set up on the west concourse within Banc of California Stadium.

Free parking will be available to voters at the Blue Structure in front of the California Science Center.

Access the 2020 Election-edition map of Banc of California Stadium

 


 

KEY DATES

• Mon Oct 19, 2020 - Deadline to Register to Vote Online

• Mon Oct 19, 2020 - Deadline for Mail-In Registration Postmarked

• Tue Oct 20, 2020 - Registration Begins

• Tue Oct 27, 2020 - Deadline to Request an Absentee Ballot (Received)

• Tue Nov 3, 2020 8:00PM PST - Deadline to Return Completed Absentee Ballot (Hand Delivered)

• Tue Nov 3, 2020 - General Election Day

Data provided by U.S. Vote Foundation

 


 

HOW TO VOTE

Register to vote

Check your registration status

Get your absentee ballot

Find local polling place

Look up your ballot

No excuse is needed to vote by mail in California.

California counties that have decided to adopt the California Voterʼs Choice Act use a vote-by-mail system for all elections, meaning that every registered receives a ballot in the mail 28 days before Election Day. As of 2020, these counties are: Amador, Butte, Calaveras, El Dorado, Fresno, Los Angeles, Madera, Mariposa, Napa, Nevada, Orange, Sacramento, San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Tuolumne.

 


 

WHAT'S ON THE BALLOT?

 District Attorney

The DA decides which criminal cases to prosecute and guides sentencing. The DA reviews complaints against police officers and decides whether or not to prosecute them. This person can have an enormous impact on your life.

 Sheriff

The sheriff runs the county jails, and is also in charge of enforcing the law throughout the county, just like a chief of police. Deputies arrest and detain suspects and patrol the county.

 City Council

Your representative makes important decisions about the future of your neighborhood, including how to spend local tax dollars. They distribute funds for road repair, parks, and development, and oversee police.

 Governor

Your governor signs bills into law (and can veto bills as well). They make important appointments to state agencies, including the stateʼs school superintendent, and can grant commutations and pardons to prisoners.

 School Board

School board members hire/fire the superintendent (who sets overall district policies, including disciplinary rules), set the budget, approve contracts for teachers, and decide where to open or close schools.

 U.S. Congress / Senate

Members of Congress and the Senate write laws—any of which can have a profound impact on you. Your representatives can help if youʼre experiencing a problem with a federal agency, like the IRS, Social Security, or veterans issues.

 Judges

Judges have enormous authority over our lives by interpreting the law, deciding what evidence is heard in a case, and deciding how long to sentence someone convicted of a crime. Since so few vote for judges, those who do have a lot of clout.

 President

The president is Commander in Chief of the armed forces and plays a huge role in shaping responses to international crises. They symbolize the goals and beliefs of the country and make sure the government does its job.

 Local & State Initiatives / Bonds

Initiatives can have a dramatic impact on our lives. Citizens or the state legislature can put a measure on the ballot for people to vote on. If theyʼre passed, they become law. They can change the tax system or the criminal justice system, for instance, including upholding or ending the death penalty or sentencing guidelines. Bonds ask voters to decide how public money will be spent and can have a positive or negative impact on your community.

 


 

GET THE FACTS BEFORE YOU VOTE

 


 

Q+A

 Q: Who can register in California?

A: To register to vote in California, you must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • Be a resident of California
  • Be at least 18 years old, or turning 18 by the election
  • Not have been declared “non-compos mentis” or “mentally incompetent” by a court of law
  • Not currently in state or federal prison or on parole for the conviction of a felony

You must register to vote at least 15 days before the election you wish to vote in, or you can register during the early voting period or on Election Day (see more under “Election Day Registration”).

 Q: How do I register to vote?
 Q: California is my home state, but I won't be home for this election. Can I still vote here?

A: Any registered California voter may apply for an absentee ballot and vote by mail. California will be mailing a ballot to every registered voter for the November election. However, California is not an exclusively vote-by-mail state, so confirm your registration and address to make sure your ballot goes to the right place.

If you need your ballot sent to an alternate address for the general election, you must submit your request by October 27 and return it by November 3. You can get request your ballot below.

 Q: Can I vote by mail?

A: Yes! California counties that have decided to adopt the California Voterʼs Choice Act use a vote-by-mail system for all elections, meaning that every registered receives a ballot in the mail 28 days before Election Day. As of 2020, these counties are: Amador, Butte, Calaveras, El Dorado, Fresno, Los Angeles, Madera, Mariposa, Napa, Nevada, Orange, Sacramento, San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Tuolumne.

Confirm your registration and vote by mail address to make sure your ballot goes to the right place.

The changes do not remove the option to cast a ballot in person. If your address has changed or you have moved, you must request your ballot by October 27 and return it by November 3. You can get your absentee ballot below.

 Q: Can I vote early?

A: Yes! Dates vary by location, so contact your local election office.

 Q: Do I need an ID?

A: ID is not required to vote in California, with the exception of federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requirements for first-time voters.

 Q: Who is our state election official?
 Q: Can I vote overseas?
 Q: I have a prior conviction. Can I vote?

A: If you have a past conviction, learn more about your eligibility to vote from Restore Your Vote.

 Q: Are there any resources for voters with disabilities?

 


 

SIGN UP TO BE A POLL WORKER

America is facing a record shortage of poll workers this year due to the coronavirus.

Most poll workers are over the age of 60 and, in the era of uncertainty caused by the coronavirus, fewer are signing up for the job (source). Our democracy depends on ordinary people who make sure elections run smoothly and everyone's vote is counted. You can make sure we have a safe, fair, efficient election for all.

Sign up now

 


 

Voting Resources

Are you registered to vote?

Register to vote

Get your absentee ballot

Find local polling place

Sign up for election reminders

Pledge to register

Track your ballot

Census

Upcoming elections

Election information one-stop shop

Rock The Vote

When We All Vote

 

 

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